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Sunday, June 14, 2009

A ship's "bones" on the beach

Peter Iredale Wreck I took this photo of the wreck of the Peter Iredale in February 2008, and decided to use it today for Scenic Sunday. The Peter Iredale is a popular destination in any season. You can drive right up to the edge of the beach. There are always curious people, photographers, kids, locals and visitors exploring the ruins or waiting for that perfect photo. To me, this angle and amount of ship exposed makes it feel almost alive, or almost like it was alive at some point. I've already posted one photo from another angle with the sun turning the shore to gold. Depending on the tides, more or less of the ship's carcass is exposed, and this view is somewhat unusual. Although I've never seen it, I know people who have been lucky enough to walk on the teak deck of the ship when even more sand has washed away. It's preserved in almost perfect condition, but at the moment it's under sand again. It appears once every few years or so. Often all you will see is the prow of the ship and a few of the metal structures that held up the masts. Every visit is different because of the action of the waves over the days and weeks before your visit, the height of the tide when you're there, the time of day, the lighting, and the weather. The tides here will go all the way to the cliffs on a very high tide, and somewhat further out than you see here when the tide is low. There's always water in the small pools that form around the wrecked prow. Another of my sunset photos that you all liked was also taken here.

The ship came aground in a storm on October 25, 1906. The wreck is a few miles south of the entrance to the Columbia river. There are just under 2,000 known shipwrecks in and around this dangerous river bar, called "The Graveyard of the Pacific." Amazingly, in this ship disaster no one was hurt, and it was lucky for us that it occurred where we can enjoy the aesthetics and romance associated with old ships and the history of the days of sailing ships.

12 comments:

Lee Spangler said...

I love the way the clouds create a "v" over the wreck and take the eye to the bow. The sky itself looks like the wake this old ship could have made.

Lewis and Clark Trail said...

That *is* a rather somber-looking sight. The photograph is quite striking.

cieldequimper said...

Hmmmm, sad. Your composition is simply superb.

Richie's 2ts Inspires said...

What a dramatic scene your share today. So cool...

Job well done.

Unseen Rajasthan said...

Wow this is such a fantastic capture !! Really amazing and your composition too is excellent..great..Also I Have Started My Own Website And Would Like You To Have A Look At It.I Would Love To Have Your Comments On That Also.Unseen Rajasthan

Artlover said...

A very exciting picture, I think. I like the vide angle and depth from it. Well done!

Jacob said...

Fascinating! Your photograph tells the tale...wonderful shot. Composition and lighting are perfect!

christina said...

Exiting photo!

The Explorer said...

Looks like a painting to me..

Las Islas Filipinas World

Don and Krise said...

I have been there several times. That is one of my favorite stretches of beach. Great photo and subject.

MamiBlue said...

Great photo.Sad to the chips.

The 3 Basenji Amigos said...

I'm late in seeing all your wonderful photos of Astoria and the surrounding areas. I am so surprised by this photo. I have not seen the ribs of this ship since I was a kid. You could see the whole body of the ship buried in the sand. I remember once running through the ribs, and hit a sink hole (not deep) and went down with my only towel, in hand....come up sopping wet. Folks laughing, and no dry towel. When I was there in 1995, you could only see the starboard, and nothing else. Love these memories.

Love the pictures.

Marti

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